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Fireworks Only Allowed with Permit

Post Date:06/17/2020 7:00 AM

This article is from The National Safety Council is America’s leading nonprofit safety advocate.   They focus on eliminating the leading causes of preventable injuries and deaths.

  Summer is synonymous with barbecues, parades and fireworks. The National Safety Council advises everyone to enjoy fireworks at public displays conducted by professionals, and not to use any fireworks at home. They may be legal but they are not safe.

In 2017, eight people died and over 12,000 were injured badly enough to require medical treatment after fireworks-related incidents. Of these, 50% of the injuries were to children and young adults under age 20. Over two-thirds (67%) of injuries took place from June 16 to July 16. And while the majority of these incidents were due to amateurs attempting to use professional-grade, homemade or other illegal fireworks or explosives, an estimated 1,200 injuries were from less powerful devices like small firecrackers and sparklers.

Additionally, fireworks start an average of 18,500 fires each year, including 1,300 structure fires, 300 vehicle fires and nearly 17,000 other fires.

Personal Fireworks Aren’t Allowed in Brentwood Neighborhoods

A reminder to residents that personal firework displays are illegal inside the City of Brentwood without a permit - something that has been part of the municipal code for many years.    The City asks that all residents be respectful of their neighbors and allow the only fireworks set off to be those in permitted displays.  Concerns about violations can be reported to the Brentwood Police at the non-emergency line only, at 615-371-0160.

If you want to hire a professional, you will need a permit for a fireworks show.

 Sparklers Are Dangerous

Every year, young children can be found along parade routes and at festivals with sparklers in hand, but sparklers are a lot more dangerous than most people think.

Sparklers burn at about 2,000 degrees – hot enough to melt some metals. Sparklers can quickly ignite clothing, and children have received severe burns from dropping sparklers on their feet. According to the National Fire Protection Association, sparklers alone account for more than 25% of emergency room visits for fireworks injuries. For children under 5 years of age, sparklers accounted for nearly half of the total estimated injuries.

Consider using safer alternatives, such as glow sticks, confetti poppers or colored streamers.

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